Text Size

Setting up a studio can be challenging, but for making a success out it so that it becomes a professional rather than remaining an expensive hobby, you have to take care of both the financial and creative side. Here are some of the guidelines that helped me creating and maintaining a photography business.

 Treat It Like A Business

One of the most important aspects to remember is that it is a business and not a hobby. People do make money with hobby, but if you are serious about it and want to make an impact to your photography, treat it like a business. Which means that not only you have to be disciplined about the profession, but also you need to consider financial implications to all your decisions.

Most of us want to be indulging in the creative aspects without wanting to get into the unappealing financial complexities. Yes, you can just start a small studio with a limited budget, treat it as a serious hobby, reap some limited income and be satisfied with that. There is absolutely nothing wrong with the approach, and many of us do start exactly the same way. In fact, if you want to experiment, skip the business section and jump into the exciting realm of equipment and setup.

 Plan Ahead

As with everything else in life, especially when finances and time are involved, it is prudent to start small taking baby steps on your initial journey. There is a tendency to over buy equipment which you probably don’t need right away. Unless you are sure with the camera and equipment companies you like, don’t invest in anything that you don’t feel comfortable with. Do not buy stop gap equipment, because you saw it cheap – most likely you will have to throw it way. Being on a budget is absolutely fine, though initially having another source of supplement income can ease the day to day pressure.

Start Small

As with everything else in life, especially when finances and time are involved, it is prudent to start small taking baby steps on your initial journey. There is a tendency to over buy equipment which you probably don’t need right away. Unless you are sure with the camera and equipment companies you like, don’t invest in anything that you don’t feel comfortable with. Do not buy stop gap equipment, because you saw it cheap – most likely you will have to throw it way. Being on a budget is absolutely fine, though initially having another source of supplement income can ease the day to day pressure.

 Devote Time Each Day

If you are working on a 9 to 5 job, then make a point to set aside a few hours each day to work on your studio. If weekdays are tied up, try some hours in the weekend (like half days on Saturday and Sunday). Familiarize yourself with your camera, its settings, and capabilities of your lenses. Experiment freely even you do not have customers. It becomes embarrassing to leaf though manuals with your clients sitting in front of you. With digital cameras, it doesn’t cost you anything to fire away. See what works for you. Should the light be six feet from the subject? Invite family and friends for free shoots, experiment heavily with them, and you can always provide a few digital copies or prints for their keepsake.

Practice

As the saying goes, if you do not practice, you will never learn. Photography is as much a craft as it is creative. A business is about repeating what you have mastered and using it repeatedly. No one gets great shots the first instance. No, professional photographers take thousands of photos, and what you see a miniscule selection out of all those images. So like any other vocation, shooting needs to be practiced, experimented, reviewed. Skill is something that needs to be gradually honed and fine-tuned.